Seeing Euclid: a networked exhibition of Euclidean texts, summer 2018

Euclidean geometry has held sway in Europe for nearly two and a half thousand years. It has been used by surveyors to map fields and architects to design buildings, and studied by generations of schoolchildren. Early thinkers turned to it as a source of philosophy; later readers saw in it a monument to the genius of the Greeks, or an exercise for improving the mind. Today Euclid is commemorated in place names, on postage stamps, and even as an interplanetary satellite.

The Elements of Geometry was written by Euclid of Alexandria around 300BCE and transmitted through the medieval world in Greek, Arabic, Latin and other languages. In the seventeenth century the Elements enjoyed a particular resurgence. Nearly 300 editions of the text appeared between 1482 and 1700, ranging in size from large library tomes to small pocket-books. Today, more than 1900 copies of these editions are extant in libraries and repositories across Britain and Ireland.

Throughout summer 2018, the ‘Seeing Euclid’ network of exhibitions will highlight the legacy of Euclid’s Elements in Early Modern Britain and Ireland, with displays of books and other artefacts from the first two hundred years of Euclid in print. Curated by the research project ‘Reading Euclid’, based at the University of Oxford and funded by the AHRC, the exhibition is a collaboration between nearly thirty institutions across Britain and Ireland. Visit us at seeingeuclid.org for a map of the participating locations, where you can also find stories about how people lived with, read, used and abused the Elements of Geometry, a most long-lived and wide-ranging cultural artefact.
download the network flyer in pdf

Network map

For a map showing the participating institutions in London, scroll down.

Armagh Robinson Library
(43 Abbey Street Armagh BT61 7DY)
Canterbury Cathedral
(Archives and Library, Cathedral House, 11 The Precincts Canterbury, CT1 2EH)
Edward Worth Library, Dublin
(Steeven's Lane, Dublin 8, D08 W2A8, Ireland)
Eton College
(Collections, Windsor SL4 6DB)
Lincoln Cathedral & University of Lincoln
(Brayford Pool, Lincoln LN6 7TS)
Marsh's Library
(St Patrick's Close, Wood Quay, Dublin, Ireland)
Maynooth University
(Collegeland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare, Ireland)
Middle Temple Library
(Ashley Building, Middle Temple Lane, London, EC4Y 9BT)
National Library of Wales
(Penglais Rd, Aberystwyth SY23 3BU)
Royal College of Physicians
(11 St Andrews Pl, London NW1 4LE)
Royal Observatory of Edinburgh
(Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ)
Royal Society of London
(6-9 Carlton House Terrace, St. James's, London SW1Y 5AG)
Senate House Library, University of London
(Malet St, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 7HU)
University College London
(23-25 Gower St, Kings Cross, London WC1E 6BT)
University of Aberdeen
(The Sir Duncan Rice Library, Bedford Road, Aberdeen)
University of Cambridge
(University Library, West Road, Cambridge CB3 9DR)
University of Glasgow
(Library Special Collections, Hillhead St, Glasgow G12 8QE)
University of Leeds
(Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery, Parkinson Building, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds LS2 9JT)
University of Leicester & Mathematical Association
(Library, PO Box 248, University Road, Leicester, LE1 9QD)
University of Liverpool
(Harold Cohen Library, Ashton Street, Liverpool, L3 5TX)
University of Manchester
(Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PP)
University of Newcastle
(University Library, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU)
University of Oxford
(Blackwell Hall, Weston Library, Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3BG)
University of St Andrews
(Library, North St, St Andrews KY16 9AJ)
Wellcome Collection
(183 Euston Rd, Kings Cross, London NW1 2BE)
Westminster School
(Little Dean's Yard, Great Smith St, Westminster, London SW1P 3PF)
Winchester College
(College St, Winchester SO23 9NA)
York Minster
(Dean's Park, York YO1 7JQ)

London

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About

Throughout summer 2018, the ‘Seeing Euclid’ network of exhibitions will highlight the legacy of Euclid’s Elements in Early Modern Britain and Ireland, with displays of books and other artefacts from the first two hundred years of Euclid in print. Curated by the research project ‘Reading Euclid’, based at the History Faculty, University of Oxford and funded by the AHRC, the exhibition is a collaboration between nearly thirty institutions across Britain and Ireland.

If you have any questions about the networked exhibition, contact the organiser Yelda Nasifoglu. For information regarding the items on display, please contact the individual institution where they are located; see the list of participating institutions.